Home articles Voice of people

Voice of people

Articles and letters may be edited for purposes of clarity, space and should carry the writer’s address, CNIC and phone numbers. Postal address: Daily Pakistan Observer, Ali Akbar House Markaz G-8, Islamabad, Pakistan. Email: editorial@pakobserver.net

Ban on CSS seminar

A Student Council of International Islamic University, Islamabad (IIUI) wanted to organize a Central Superior Services (CSS) Seminar purported to provide guidance and motivation for varsity students, and some expert CSS mentors were also expected to be guests to share their experience, knowledge and guidance to CSS aspirants. Following the initial permission, the Council had invested money on advertising as well, but, at the eleventh hour it was banned by Student Advisory Office and called police to restrain them to conduct seminar.
This is a deplorable tragedy for our universities and educational institutions wherein permission is easily granted when it comes to celebrate Holi, Christmas, Diwali, etc but activities, which are concerned with future of students, are prohibited. It is a state of shamelessness and condemnation to ban such motivational and educational events and seminars in varsity merely on personal grudge.
Being a real aspirant of CSS, I {myself} was very curious to attend the seminar to get benefit, even though I am not part of any Student Council or organization as such, but my registration for seminar remained in vain. Responsible people involved in this appalling act should be asked and taken action against them instead of squabbling with the protesting students. And, importantly, permission should be given to re-arrange this seminar without any hindrance.
ZAHID ALI ZOHRI
Gilgit-Baltistan

Training for Lawyers

Lawyer is a noble profession, but nowadays we don’t have that stuff and substance in this profession as we hear and read about the past legal eagles and law wizards. Many legal practitioners would agree that legal training is absolutely essential despite acquiring an LLB or Bar at Law. Simply a law degree does not equip one enough to practise as a lawyer. Many such lawyers bring disrepute to the profession for their lack of knowledge and expertise in law.
In Pakistan, we speak of speedy and inexpensive justice, but do nothing to enhance competence and sharpen skills of lawyers. It is a painful reality that there is not structured legal training for lawyers who are important players in the administration of justice. When it comes to their passion for learning, lawyers from Hyderabad and Islamabad have always shown never–failing love for learning.
The same urge to quench their thirst also exists among lawyers from other parts of the country, but no proper institution exists as we have judicial academies for judges, court personnel, district attorneys, law officers, etc. Building capacity of legal fraternity members, both young and senior, develop certain skills or competences and upgrade their performance ability is the need of the hour. In this connection, it is proposed that there is an urgent need that the judicial academies should develop a lawyers’ training program so as to standardize the training of future lawyers. For this purpose, the Federal Ministry of Law, Justice and provincial law departments and INGOs/NGOs should come forward to collaborate with the legal bodies such as provincial bar councils, Supreme Court Bar Association so that capacity building training may be arranged frequently. If we really need good lawyers and good judges out of them then capacity building training(s) for them is as necessary as oxygen for life.
HASHIM ABRO
Islamabad

Evil of street begging

Dear Sir, I shall feel grateful to you if you please publish the following few lines in the columns of your esteemed daily against the evils of street begging. As we all know that beggars are one of the most miserable people on earth. They depend on others for the fulfillment of their needs. They are treated badly and are deprived of the basic necessities. The evil of street begging are great threat to the social image of the country. They move from door to door and from shop to shop. They sings Holy songs to excite the religious feelings of the people.
It is a matter of shame that even after many years of independence our roads and streets are still infested with beggars. One can not escape their pleadings for alms. They seem to be omnipresent. It is a great nuisance to have beggars around you at the bus stops, railway stations, market compound and religious places. Even when one tries to avoid them, it is difficult to get out of their clutches. Sometimes these beggars embarrass you and you have to part with some coins even against your will. If these beggars happen to spot some foreigners, they would not leave them until they force them to give them alms. What impression of our country these foreigners will take back.
Some of the beggars appear to be quite healthy and stout. It seems they have found begging to the most convenient method of earning money. I feel that Government must ban begging and haul the beggars. The healthy beggars should be force to work for their livelihood. If the eminence of begging is not checked immediately, it will turn out to be a big social evil in times to come. Public cooperation is solicited to curb this evil from our society.
ALINA MATEE
Karachi

Female literacy

Literacy plays a major role in contributing to a thriving economy. However, in Pakistan we are still caught up in an education crisis where a significant number of children are out of school. If we look at a num of female students enrolled in schools and colleges, the statistics is even worse. Around the world, there are 76 million young women who are illiterate. This means these women are not empowered enough to take control of and transform their life or support their families. In Pakistan’s context, a high school certificate is considered as high education for young girls and even then only a small percentage of girls manage to complete high school education.
In such circumstances, it is extremely important that the significance of literacy is promoted among the masses through various literacy activities. The Karachi Literature Festival (KLF) is one such event which reflects our literary traditions and act as a catalyst in promoting the reading culture in our society. Such festivals not only cultivate the reading habit but also promote the accessibility of books and authors to young readers. As a concerned citizen, I urge policy makers to highlight such festivals and organize similar events across the country to create an interest in books and reading among the populace.
USMAN KHAN
Via email

Road accidents

Road accidents are undoubtedly the most frequent and, overall cause of main damages. The reason behind this is the extremely dense road traffic and the relatively great freedom of movement given to drivers. The overall number of accidents during the past three years was about 30000 accidents per year. Recently in Multan, three people, including two women, were killed when a motorcycle collided with a tractor-trolley near Sikandar Nala.
The most worrisome cause is the parents allowing their minor and immature children to drive high-end vehicles on the road, they do maximum accidents. Apart from this, the traffic police appear to be lazily indifferent to the problem of road rage. Often the jumping of red light is condoned. Even after being caught red-handed the culprits are not punished because of their political connections. It is my earnest request to the concerned authority for taking serious action on this issue and save the life of the sprout by making some restrictions for them because Allah gave precious importance of kids in the eye of their parents.
USMAN KHAN
Via email

Keep the city clean

The clean-up marshals appointed by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) and stationed at various corners of Mumbai to keep the city clean are rouges. I have seen on several occasions clean-up marshals at Sion, Nariman Point, Mumbai CST and elsewhere in the city not issuing receipts to offenders for littering and spitting on the roads.
One clean-up marshal even slapped me when I confronted him for not issuing a receipt to an offender and told me to mind my own business. When I brought this matter to the notice of the civic officials, they did not take action against the errant clean-up marshal. These clean-up marshals are extortionists. They have nothing to do with cleanliness. They extort money from people in the name of cleaning up the city.
JUBEL D’CRUZ
Mumbai, India