GROHE launches the ‘Green School’ program in Pakistan

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Observer Report
Karachi

GROHE, the leading global brand for full bathroom solutions and kitchen fittings launched its Green School program in Pakistan in collaboration with Zindagi Trust schools.

The program is an adaptation of the brand’s award-winning initiative, Green Mosque, previously done by GROHE in the United Arab Emirates, Turkey and Egypt. It was created to guarantee the responsible use of water by granting the conservation of thousands of liters.

Striving for the highest levels of sustainability is an integral and essential part of GROHE’s DNA and, in addition to quality, technology and design, sustainability is the brand’s core value.

GROHE consistently pursues a 360-degree sustainability approach that incorporates defined areas of activity of employees, suppliers, customers, processes, products, and social responsibility in equal measure.

As part of its effort to spread awareness about the importance of environmental sustainability and the optimal use of water resources by reducing consumption, GROHE partnered with Zindagi Trust to launch the Green School program at two schools in Karachi, namely Khatoon-e-Pakistan Government Girls School and SMB Fatima Jinnah Government Girls School.

The existing faucets at the schools’ washrooms were replaced with self-closing faucets provided by GROHE for each school.

“For the last 10 years, GROHE’s mission has been to expand awareness about water conservation and shift water consumption habits with the sole aim of saving water.

Educating the younger generations about the importance of water conservation is a must, which is why we decided to collaborate with Zindagi Trust to equip their schools with water-saving faucets that will help them introduce the need for sustainability to children from a young age” said Mohammed Ataya, ‎Leader, Gulf and Pakistan, LIXIL EMENA.

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