July 5, a black day

Malik Atif M Majoka

On July 05 1977, Pakistan plunged into the darkest era of its history. A democratically elected government was over thrown by one of the worst dictators of recent times. Pakistani nation went hostage to a group of thugs who mutilated Pakistani society to unrecognizable levels. Anyone who lived in pre-Zia era Pakistan, can never recognise Pakistan of present day. At the behest of foreign selfish imperialists, Zia along with coterie of generals destroyed the very fabric of Pakistani society. The concept of Pakistani nationhood got first uprooted and then replanted, watered with extremism and fertilized with concocted ideology.
The plant grew up and now it’s a tree, bearing fruits of killings, intolerance, drugs, illegal arms and so forth. It is an irony that the generation that never played any role in destroying Pakistani society is now paying price with their blood to extinguish the fire lit by Gen Zia and his cohorts. Opportunism driven pro establishment politicians of larger province embraced Gen Zia and conspired to transform the society through strings of religious seminaries, the nexus then interpolated with educations system and defiled young minds with manufactured history. The distortion was so complete that after so many years in post-Zia Pakistan, the confusion about the creation of Pakistan is widespread.
Younger Pakistanis of today are not sure what makes a Pakistani. What comes first, faith or land? The question most young Pakistanis are grappling to find correct answer to. Murder of Amjad Sabri has further complicated the situation. Faith has been turned into a commodity. So called custodians of faith are more worried about beating women instead of widespread corruption, rising cost of living, unemployment, state’s failure to deliver essentials like protection of life and property of citizens. The day that changed it all was 05 July 1977. Pakistan should declare the day as “Black day”. Bravo to those law enforcers who are giving their lives today to restore sanity in Pakistani society. Optimism demands that we should keep faith in our country. There will be a dawn of peace and harmony.
—Doveton, Melbourne Australia

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