Speculative reporting


A MEETING of the top civilian and military leadership, held in Islamabad on Monday, lamented the trend of speculative reporting by a section of the press and in this connection referred to a story published recently about deliberations of the National Security Committee. It regretted that the story in question was violative of universally acknowledged principles of reporting on national security issues and has risked the vital state interests through inclusion of inaccurate and misleading contents.
Every saner Pakistani would tend to agree with the conclusions drawn by the meeting as nowhere in the world free-for-all things are allowed on the issues of national security and defence. No doubt, media is acting as watchdog but there are certain limits and redlines which must not be crossed in reporting things or making comments on them. The role played by Indian media should be an eye-opener for Pakistani journalists and editors as media in India was seen one step ahead of the Government in highlighting and promoting the national cause. Indian media is doing so even at the risk of its own reputation, which was evident from the fake interview run by a channel about so-called surgical strikes. Apart from this, Indian media is also trying to depict as if Pakistan stands completely isolated and for this purpose it is blowing up statements of world leaders out of context as well. Indian media played up remarks of Russian Ambassador in New Delhi about surgical strikes but ignored clarification by Moscow that his statement does not reflect viewpoint of Russian Federation. Similarly, China categorically rebuffed India’s latest demand for support on NSG issue by saying that it cannot extend support violating principles and criteria laid down for the purpose but India media claimed Beijing was ready to explore ‘possibilities’ on the issue. Pakistan is fighting war of its survival and dignity and it is duty of every segment of the society to contribute its share in winning this war.