Karzai spews venom against Pakistan, forgets its hospitality

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Kaswar Klasra

Islamabad

It is said, if one feeds a serpent milk, the snake will simply increase his venom. This is what’s happening to Pakistan.
Hamid Karzai, former president of Afghanistan, whose entire tribe including his family, took refuge in Pakistan following Soviet Union’s invasion in 1979 has advised US President Donald Trump to make a dramatic, strategic and immediate shift in US policy towards Pakistan.
Spewing venom against Pakistan, former president of Afghanistan went on to say last Week on Friday that anything less than that will be a continuation of Afghan misery and rise of extremism.
His shameless statement came a few months after Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif granted a further three-month extension to the stay of registered Afghan refugees in the country, permitting them to live in Pakistan till March 31, 2017.
The cabinet while deliberating on agenda item on Extension of the Proof of Registration (PoR) Cards and Tripartite Agreement in respect of Registered Afghan Refugees approved the extension till 31st March 2017,” the Prime Minister’s Office said in a statement after the meeting held in September, 2016.
Karzai’s statement, however, did not come as a surprise for Islamabad as the later said last week on Friday that ‘for Trump to be successful’ he must take a hard stand against Pakistan and break the status quo.
Speaking to Pakistan Observer on condition of anonymity, higher officials of Nawaz Sharif’s government said Karzai was on a mission to defame Pakistan for obvious reason.
“He is on a mission to defame Pakistan and the ISI on International front. I’m sure he will be failed badly like his master (India),” said one of the officials. He added that Pakistan needs not to worried about him.
Karzai’s comments came at a time when there is a change of guard in the United States and civilian casualties in Afghanistan are highest since 2001, when the American government unleashed its war against terror. A report compiled by United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan stated that the number of civilian casualties in 2015 was over 11,000, the highest since 2009. Approximately 8,400 casualties were reported till September, 2016 and the annual figure is expected to cross the 2015 number. Unfortunately, Afghanistan sees Pakistan’s hand behind most of the incidents of terrorism, a charge which Pakistan has rejected all the time.
What Karzai failed to realize is that, some three million Afghan refugees are living in Pakistan, half of whom are unregistered. Following Soviet Union’s invasion even entire Karzai tribe including his family took refuge in Pakistan for years. Millions of Afghans consider Afghanistan as their second home.
Pakistanis welcomed their Afghan brothers, offered homes, food and everything they wanted. Even Hamid Karzai, during his stint as President of war-torn Afghanistan, acknowledged Pakistan’s services.
In October 2011, Hamid Karzai, the president of Afghanistan, surprised the world when he said on Pakistani TV his country would stand with its neighbour whoever attacked it – even the U.S.
‘If fighting starts between Pakistan and the U.S., we are beside Pakistan,’ Karzai said. If Pakistan is attacked and the people of Pakistan need Afghanistan’s help, Afghanistan will be there with you.’
According to an article published by UK based prestige Daily Mail, Karzai said his country was indebted to Pakistan for taking in millions of Afghan refugees over the years and stressed that Kabul would not allow any nation – be it the U.S., India, Russia, China or anyone else – to dictate its policies.
‘Anybody that attacks Pakistan, Afghanistan will stand with Pakistan,’ he said. ‘Afghanistan will never betray its brother; Karzai was quoted by the UK’s prestige daily mail on October 24, 2011.
However, time has changed now. The man, who used to be Pakistan’s friend once, has turned its back for obvious reasons.
It’s high time for policy makers in Pakistan to take time while choosing friends in Afghanistan, a nation of ungrateful people.